Weird Word
English, as we know is a living language. And like all living languages is in a state of constant change. So that the English of say the 13th or 14th century would be almost unintelligible to us.

Today we bring you sixteen such words that we came across, gone and forgotten, but interesting enough to be considered for resurrection. We would like your opinion on that.

So here are the words in alphabetical order

1.    Astrolgamage

This signifies a kind of Miss Cleos of the medieval era. Astrolgamages claimed that they could make predictions by observing what was happening in the sky.

2.    Crapulence

This word derives from the Latin crapula. It was defined as “intestinal and cranial distress…arising from intemperance and debauchery.” A rather elaborate way of expressing the feeling after a heavy drinking session. If you are drunk you are crapulent.

3.    Eye-servant

A servant who gives only eye service. That is a servant who only works when his master’s eyes are on him. Change servant to “employee” and master to “boss”, and you may be surprised how many “eye-servants” you know.

4.    Flitterwochen

This word is Old English. It means a honeymoon. It was probably borrowed from German and literally translates to “fleeting weeks”.

5.    Fribbler

Coming from the 18th century, this word signifies a man who is involved in a relationship but refuses to commit. This act by the way was known as “fribbledom”. Almost certainly you know a fribbler or two.

6.    Groaning-cheese

Groaning-cheese is just Cheese. In medieval England, it was a tradition that women, as soon as they realized they were expecting would prepare a wheel of cheese and set it to age. And when the “groaning time” came around a group of women would gather to comfort and assist, and after the birth they would be given this cheese to eat.

7.    Grog-blossom

The result of long-time heavy drinking are dilated blood vessels. This is particularly visible on the nose. So, in the 18th century, a drinker’s nose was called a grog-blossom. These days you would see that mostly in elderly homeless people.

8.    Lettice-cap

A Lettice-cap was a 16th and 17th Century device which resembled a hair-net. It was used as a medical device supposed to cure insomnia and headaches. Thepatient’s head was shaved and the Lettice-cap, filled with herbs was placed on his head.

9.    Mumpsimus

A Middle English word that seems to have been a spelling mistake by an illiterate 15th centurycleric. The original meaning was “an incorrigible, dogmatic pedant”, but later its meaning changed to “an incorrect opinion someone clung to.”

10.    Night-hag

From the medieval times to the 19th century, nightmares were attributed to a demon called a Night-hag. This female demon was supposed to kidnap a person at night on horseback and give them nightmares “by producing a feeling of suffocation”.

11.    Nimgimer

A surgeon who specialized in curing pox or the clap was called a Nimgimmer in the 17th century.

12.    Numbles

An Anglo-Saxon word, derived from French and referring to the intestines and internal organs of an animal, often a deer, that was eaten by peasants in a dish called “garbage pye”.

13.    Petty-fogger

This is word in common use from the 16th to the 19th century, referring to a lawyer who was willing to quibble over insignificant facts or use unethical means to win a case. Not surprisingly, “pettifogging” is still found in modern dictionaries

14.    Pettysnye

Attributed to Chaucer, who used it to denote a sweetheart. I dare you to use it on the next Valentine’s Day.

15.    Pilgarlik

A 16th Century word which meant a bald head. Apparently that was supposed to resemble a peeled garlic.

16.    Rattoner

An exterminator of rats was called a rattoner in the 14th century. You will agree it is a less extreme term than exterminator.

So which of these terms do you think should be brought back?

http://www.aartiinformatics.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/WeirdWord.gifhttp://www.aartiinformatics.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/WeirdWord.gifAarti InformaticsCAREERSTUDYforgotten words,interesting words,living language,weird wordsEnglish, as we know is a living language. And like all living languages is in a state of constant change. So that the English of say the 13th or 14th century would be almost unintelligible to us. Today we bring you sixteen such words that we came across, gone and...Daily News, News Magazine, Online Magazine