CyclingAre you an avid cyclist, in your middle age? Do you cycle a lot? Then, perhaps you should pay attention to this. According to a recent report published in the Daily Mail Online, a recent study published in the ‘Journal of Men’s Health’ seems to suggest that men aged 50 or above who cycle at least 9 hours a week face an increased risk of prostate cancer.

The study undertaken by the University College, London was undertaken to ascertain relationships if any between erectile dysfunction, infertility and prostate cancer, and cycling. It involved 5,200 riders. The study concluded that while no link was found cycling and erectile dysfunction or infertility, one may exist with prostate cancer.

The study indicated that men over 50 who cycled more than 9 hours a week may be five times as prone to contract prostate cancer. Millions of people in Britain have taken to cycling in recent year and the figure is growing every year.

While this was the first study to link cycling and prostate cancer, earlier studies have shown that there were definite ties between testicular cancer and cycling. However, it emerged that there was no link between cycling and infertility or erectile dysfunction.

But the team also said that this was a statistical link, tested on 2000 participants who were over fifty, and does not necessarily prove that cycling is a direct cause of prostate cancer. It may be that such people are more health-conscious, and go for physical checkups more often, thus having more chances of being diagnosed.

Further research has revealed, though, that these people were no more likely to do so than other. They also said that there is a possibility that increased pressure on the prostate could have caused the cancer.

Prostate CancerThe study author Dr. Mark Hamer, Department of Epidemiology, UCL says that the results are not straightforward, and as the sample of men who cycled the most was small, more research is needed. Besides, the study only included keen cyclists who ride for nine hours a week or more, so people who simply commute to work were not involved. At the same time he also stressed on the fact that cycling undoubtedly led to several health benefits such as reducing the risk of type II diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

In Britain, cycling has seen a massive rise in the last decade. About 600 million more people had taken to the cycle in 2012 than in 1993. Most of these have been men.

So, what we have here is a statistical link between extended cycling time and prostate cancer. It cannot prove that increased cycling time leads to prostate cancer, but only an association. The researchers point out that ordinary cyclists such as those who commute to work or cycle for recreation, should not be concerned. Besides, cycling has so many benefits. It increases your physical fitness and stamina, it keeps many lifestyle diseases away. Most experts would agree that the benefits are far more significant than whatever risk there may be. Not to mention, the companionship of a growing community of cyclists, with whom you can go on short trips and see the country. Local cycling clubs arrange regular tours where you can visit notable places, breathe the fresh air, and get rid of your stress. On the balance, we would say, as a middle-aged cyclist, there is more to gain from regular cycling, than there are risks. What do you think?

Cycling Linked To Prostate Cancer In Men: Is That Really So?http://www.aartiinformatics.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Cycling.jpghttp://www.aartiinformatics.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Cycling-300x300.jpgAarti InformaticsMEN'S HEALTHRELATIONSHIPcancer causes,cycling time,health benefits,health consciousAre you an avid cyclist, in your middle age? Do you cycle a lot? Then, perhaps you should pay attention to this. According to a recent report published in the Daily Mail Online, a recent study published in the ‘Journal of Men’s Health’ seems to suggest that men aged...Daily News, News Magazine, Online Magazine